Wallpaper in the Bathroom!

Is it a surprise I should be daydreaming of vibrant and colorful wallpaper prints and florals in bathrooms? Not really. You may all know my secret love for bathroom design by now…if not, refer to some of my past blog posts or my collected images on my Pinterest board.

And, it will come as no surprise that, in desperate need of SPRING weather and color (I keep on looking outside my window with sad dog eyes) I want flowers!!!

What happened to the weather this year, folks? Seriously, a coat in May???

I will not be stopped by grey skies and apathetic temperatures…

Working on a recent powder bathroom wallpaper project, I sifted through endless possibilities and wanted to share a few inspiration bathrooms I love :

Tilton Fenwick Downtown Loft Powder Room photo: Trevor Tondro

This fabulous and daring print from Osborne & Little used by the talented designer duo Tilton Fenwick created a snappy little powder room. And all the brass fixtures are so in right now!

Kate Simpson.

This powder bathroom designed by Kate Simpson is defined by the wallpaper and those elegant monogrammed towels. The wallpaper gives an immediate zesty and refreshing vibe to the room. Photo via Lonnymag.com

A Gracious Home by Suzanne Kasler

 I love this bathroom by fave interior “grande dame” Suzanne Kasler: Katie Ridder’s exquisite wallpaper designs always add so much to a room, don’t you think? Suzanne creates a seemingly effortless blend of elegance and comfort, striking the right balance between color, textures and styles. A bit of this and a bit of that always goes a long way in my view! Photo via Architectural Digest

Stark Wallpaper. Design by Rafael de Cardenas.

This art nouveau style Stark Wallpaper instantly defines the room, giving it distinctive and dark appeal. Sumptuous against a rasberry glass vase and two slender purple flowers. Design by Rafael de Cardenas. Photo via ELLE DECOR

Wallpapers In A Bathroom

This green and white floral wallpaper screams SPRING! via Shelterness 

For a recent powder bath project I designed, we decided to go moody and very bold. I also knew wallpaper would make the room.

The bathroom originally looked like this :

Ugly Bathroom-1A much improved bathroom looked like this:

Photo and Design Barbara Elza Hirsch | Chez ElzaAnd I want you to see how the final Cole & Son wallpaper selection will look (mirror is awesome but a little small, may be changed):

Photo and Design Barbara Elza Hirsch | Chez ElzaIn progress design project by Elza B. Design, Inc | Photo Chez Elza

ColeandSonWallpaper-SummerLilyThis breathtaking Lily print Cole & Son is pretty cool, no? Stay tuned for AFTER pics of this project in the year to come. Photo via Lee Jofa

Life is short, have fun…wallpaper possibilities are endless:

Groundworks-KWearstler-WallpaperCrescent by Kelly Wearstler wallpaper via Lee Jofa

 

Wallpaper-C&SonNuvolette by Cole & Son via Lee Jofa

Wallpaper-CS-Geisha tealGeisha by Cole & Son via Lee Jofa

A bientot!

 

 

 

Moving Away From An Ugly Bathroom-Design Project

Remember my embarrassing shower post? Well, that bathroom is no more…

I am documenting here a new bathroom I am designing in its place, an eclectic mix of more organic materials, such as slate tile and weathered wood, with elegant yet low key details.

Before Picture-Master Project | Chez Elza

Before Picture of The Farm House Project Master Bathroom, Photo credit: Barbara Elza Hirsch

FarmHouse Bathroom Project | Chez ElzaInsulation has been blown in, sub-floor installed and copper pan is ready to receive the shower. Photo credit: Barbara Elza Hirsch

Floor tile is down, walls are up! | Chez ElzaFloor slate tile freshly installed, walls as well! Photo credit: Barbara Elza Hirsch

And now for the glass tile wall in the shower! | Chez ElzaThe beautiful glass tile wall goes up, but alas, the installer does not butter the backs of the tile, and the translucent nature of some of these will force us to redo the installation in a few weeks.  Photo credit: Barbara Elza Hirsch

Honed Carrerra Marble | Chez ElzaBeautiful honed marble top over a custom vanity designed by Elza B. Design. Photo credit: Barbara Elza Hirsch

The Brizo faucet | Chez ElzaBrizo “Baliza” Faucet, a sinuous design ideal for an older home. Photo credit: Barbara Elza Hirsch

Master Bathroom-Progress PicsAlmost ready! Waiting for pulls, glass shower door and redo of shower tile. Toto toilet. Photo credit: Barbara Elza Hirsch

Note how I went from a one sink vanity to a double sink vanity. Even in a smaller bathroom, it’s well worth the splurge and actually makes the whole space seem bigger. I used the weathered wood mirrors to blend in with the old farm house character of the house and help tone down the fancy details.

Hope you enjoy this!

The Case of the Embarrassing Shower -It’s all in the Construction!!!

We purchased our little farmhouse knowing some rooms needed work. We loved that there was a master bathroom, complete with rain shower head. The colors and tile were not to our liking but we had to live with it for a while. Well. It’s official: I hate my bathroom!!!! This was bound to happen, when you consider the color scheme in this bathroom :

The Embarrassing Bathroom- Evidence piece number 1. A milky pinkish, beige color scheme with a greyish patterned granite vanity counter top.

You heard well. Too many “ish” in a description to define color is a red flag.

We used to live in a house with one bathroom for a family of four. I know we are blessed to have 2 1/2 now. The square footage in this bathroom is decent for an old New England home. I love that we have a window.

But my eyes hurt.

And now, for the worse part: The shower was not constructed properly. This past year, the paint has started to peel.The clear door sweeps have started to yellow. Yes. I kid you not.

The Embarrassing Bathroom-Evidence piece number 2- No need for words. Same problem on the other side…

So There. My Secret. Shared. I am sure you have a few embarrassing secrets of your own. Life happens.

I resolved to solve this. I spoke with Shahab Shokouhi, a Writer at Dulles Glass and Mirror — a manufacturer of commercial and residential glass products including tempered glass, replacement glass, and shower doors.

Shahab shared some wonderful tips for a well constructed frameless glass shower enclosure:

 

When designing one’s shower door enclosure, Shahab explains there are several tips to follow to avoid leaks and mold. Following are four helpful tips that will keep the outside of your shower dry, and the installation of your shower enclosure, seamless.

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Tip 1: The Showerhead Position

To minimize leakage, you never want your showerhead positioned facing the opening of the shower door. You want the showerhead to be facing the tiled walls or fixed panels. This will help keep the water inside the shower enclosure, and not on your bathroom floor. In the illustrations above, the first two examples are ideal. Avoid what is shown in the third example.

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Tip 2: Raised Tiles and Overhangs

When dealing with odd overhangs and raised tiles, one might wonder the best way to keep the water in one’s new shower.

For one, to avoid gaps between the wall and the glass, use a fixed glass panel in your shower design and notch the tile so that the panel can be lined up flush against the wall. The maximum width and depth for notching raised tile is ¾” (depth) and ½” (width). To notch overhangs deeper than ¾” depth, you will need to consult a tile professional. Keep in mind that the enclosure may in some instances still require the use of a metal filler (pictured above right) between the glass and the buttress wall.

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Tip 3: Curb Tops

To decrease the likelihood of leaks in your shower enclosure, make sure that the curb top you use is a solid piece of tile, marble, or granite. In the event that a shower curb is tiled with small horizontal tiles, the grout joints become an area where water collects and ultimately, mold and mildew forms. Having one solid piece for the curb top (without any grout lines) alleviates this potential problem. See the third picture above, to see the ideal curb top for your glass shower enclosure.

And here I am adding another image to demonstrate Shahab’s point:

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Tip 4: Pipes and Wiring

This tip is especially helpful if you’re installing a shower in a new section of your home, perhaps an unfinished basement. Be wary of any plumbing pipe and electrical wiring where you will be anchoring your shower enclosure. Anchoring screws may puncture anything behind the studs or walls.

These tips will ensure your shower enclosure avoids leakage and mold, and is easy to clean and maintain. Not to mention, being diligent in your shower enclosure design, ensures that the installers run into zero problems come installation day.

Thank you, Shahab, of Dulles Glass and Mirror , for assisting me in presenting construction tips on a seamless shower!!!

I will be busy re-designing my bathroom in the following year and I will make sure to follow these important pointers!

Enjoy your day! A la prochaine!